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think so, but yeah, after a year or less after columbine, "the new york times" asked me to do a reported piece on the dash comac in denver and iceboat spent four days doing that and i was so thrilled to do something so lighthearted, nothing violent here, just people having fun and i said at that time, i am never doing another story on murder as long as i live. it was a huge emotional relief. but then i kept coming back. almost done with "columbine." my editors talk to me about perhaps a paperback afterward or something and i'm still talking to you. i have a u.k. tour in a week and, but i think i'm just about done. i would like to be done. i felt a huge relief after i turned in the final pages but i didn't even notice right away, within the next month friends started asking me you know, what is going on? you seem happier. are you dating someone? really, is there something going on? no, i turned up look in. it was finally off my chest. it was for better or worse after i turned bad in. i got in trouble for doing so much but i wanted to get this right. once i sent those things off, or better
of the american revolution with a focus on the middle colony, new york, new jersey and portions of pennsylvania. it also recalls the importance of the region during the war and visit several sites to document their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don't know and the one that brings us here to delancey st., "my american revolution." in my humble opinion each of these books is in its way a masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive, e. tizon i
away. so completely fill my mind that my grades plummeted. i had bucks. the new york public library, thank god for the new york public library. i had books. so when i had the difficulties of my mom, i found my emotional voice and portrait of the artist of the and and, his mother asked him to pray with her. he refused. and that tension. and i had the idea of sometimes being fearful. i had steven crane. books gave me a voice that expressed my individual humanity . and those books then helped turn you into a writer. do you want to talk for a moment of the have you got into writing? >> i began writing. i have speech difficulties as well. my siblings all have speech difficulties. we came up from west virginia. and i could not speak very well or read very well allowed, but eventually the teacher said, okay, you can write something, copied down. if you laugh at me and will, books and you. hit you. depending how far you were. but she said, i could read something. began writing in the palms. i really enjoy that. that was the only thing i was praised for that age. and i enjoyed writing. i dro
a conversationalist and became a striking young woman then she had her debut in new york. she came back a few years later. nothing could out do the flurry of excitement that hetty encountered the fall of 1860. this city shimmered with the news as the prince of wales was coming. a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society trimmed their moustaches women spent hours and at 9:00 p.m. friday october 12th couples who had paid $10 apiece arrived at the academy of music. men with white ties and women with hoopskirt its with brocade, sat tin, lead tools, gave special nods to precisely at 10:00 p.m. the orchestra played god save the queen and the small prints stepped into the room. nearly 3,000 of new york's finest citizens rushed to meet him and with the rash the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously the aghast rushed to follow they had lobster salad, pat day and filled glasses with champagne. at 2:00 with their dance floor fixed eager females waited their turn for a dance and finally the young woman was tapped. stunning in her low cut white gown with pink and her arms covered wit
. new york, new jersey, and portions of pennsylvania. the author recalls the importance of the region during the war and visits several sites to document their historical significance and it plans date today. from washington's crossing of the dollar to the battle of brooklyn, it is about an hour and 15. [applause] >> this subtitle of this book is old irishman. it is a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known to geniuses in my life. one is dead, and the other, robert sullivan, is alive. although that reversal in is not the robber solomon he was receiving. not exactly, but more but then the moment. first, brazil and is the author of seven extra hour bucks. meadowlands, will hunt, how not to get rich, rats, cross-country , the throw you don't know, and the one that brings us here, my american revolution. in mine and humble opinion each of these books is its own line and masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive. each is an investigation of the american my state and song skate into relative with the american landscape. fleet contends
producers traveled the area as we explore the livery seen in new york's capital city and surrounding towns. .. >> and programs with young writers and a summer institute that we in saratoga. >> my life in the last few years was, i suppose you'd call it adventurous. but this thing ruined everything. [laughter] >> we go far and wide, find the best writers that we can ask and bring them to albany. it's like bringing the world the a particular place. and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organization, even some of the better known ones in major cities that have such a regular flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public. with our open door policy. we bring the literary world to albany. so all these people whose names, faces and dates, events you see are people who have come from far and wide to read to the general public here. and we've had somewhere, my most recent count now has gotten us up to at least 10 or probably 11 nobel laureates across the years ranging from toni morrison who actually used to teach at albany to most recently a south african writer, and
screen is a photograph taken in 1942, buffalo, new york, university of pennsylvania professor, what are we looking at? >> guest: at a woman who committed suicide at the hotel in buffalo during that year, and a photographer happened to be passing by and took the picture that appeared in "life" at the time and one widely acclaimed award for having been able to catch the moment at the pern's death, at the moment in which the person was about to die. this is really the start of a whole tradition, a whole legacy of photos of people facing death that cluttered our news stations ever since. >> host: you use the word "cluttered," what's the value of seeing that picture? >> guest: the value of the picture like that pulls us in subjectively. it's an emotional, dramatic picture, memorable, pulling in all emotions through which we can engage in the event, the event that it's depicking, and this is important in news because not only do we want to understand what we're seeing, but we want to feel important things about what we're seeing. we want to feel fear, anguish, compassion, mentality, all k
print. and the institute was founded in 1983 but officially became the new york state writers' institute in 1984, and over the years we've had more than a thousand writers through. >> my sister was a rabid conservative who, actually, worked at w's first convention. and she couldn't get a room, so she ended up having to stay with me, and she brought a sign she was holding that said "w stands for women." [laughter] and i said, you can stay, but the sign has to go. [laughter] >> as a result, we have a very extensive archive of those writers, the readings, interviews with them, and i guess we like to think of ourselves as perhaps becoming the c-span of literature. i don't know, we'll see what happens with that. but we're about to roll out a, what is, in essence, a kind of virtual research library of all of these videos and audios that we've collected over the years. we're told by many people it's the most thorough going archive of contemporary writing that they know of in america. one of the things that helps is to be writers ourselves and to know what makes a writer comfortable, to respect
conversations] >> we continue our live coverage from the national book awards here in new york city. this is one of the nominated books. "the boy kings of texas. " a memoir. domingo martinez is the awe their. mr. martinez now joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would
time is limited. she has worked for the new york times since 1995. reporting on domestic policy, national politics, immigration, the presidential campaign of 2004, and 2008, and first lady michele obama and her role in the obama white house. i met rachel at an event this year where i bought a book, the book she wrote, "american tapestry: the story of the black, white, and multiracial ancestors of michelle obama". after hearing her talk, i'd bought six more copies. i bought them for all my family members and to give out as christmas gifts. now after having read her book i can tell you it was a good investment. it helps me better understand my own family and many mysteries surrounding my own family. rachel l. swams's book is a compelling story that stirs deep emotions. it is also a story that would break them here and with that, let's welcome rachel l. swams. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. >> thank you for coming. in the years leading up to the presidential election, the focus seems to be on barack obama's roots and his family and the fact that he wrote his own biography. now
is the man who can't miss. of the new york magazine times on its cover proclaimed him as having had transformed publishing and here's why. he holds the guinness record for the most number one "new york times" bestsellers of any author ever. in 2011 it was estimated that one in four of all hardcover suspense thriller novels sold with the bad mr. patterson. selling over 300 billion copies of his books worldwide, that's 300 million copies. he's also the the first other to achieve 5 million e-book sales and by now has probably hit in william as we sit in this room. what is impressive about all of this though is that the successes and based solely on a similar site the ever popular alice crossed in the women's murder club at michael bennet series. he's also the current best-selling author and and a young adult and middle grade categories. it's not just about his success either. he's won the coveted edgar award, the bca mystery guild ruler of the year award from an internist thriller of the year award from the reader's digest readers choice award and the children's choice but councils chi
of the most remarkable aspects of this popular interest was that a newspaper called the new york sun -- this was penny press paper -- took a tremendous interest in this case. now the penny press you will need to know, was a new kind of newspaper meant for a broader part of the population. the old commercial newspapers were more expensive than they were usually bought by upper artisans, merchants and middle-class people and people involved in commerce but the penny press was basically for working people, especially in new york. so the editor of the new york sun sends not only correspondence to new london and the new haven, he also sends artists and i want to show you what one of them produce. now this is an amazing image. here is a pose of a heroic roman conqueror. with his machete in his hand. he is like an avenger of justice, is he not? you have got to put this into the context of most of the graphic representation of people of african descent in this period were racist in the extreme. so, this is a very different kind of image. the first time i saw that i thought my goodness, it mu
in 1942. buffalo, new york. university of pennsylvania professor, what are we looking at? >> via looking at a woman who committed suicide out of a hotel in buffalo during the year, and a photographer happen to be passing by and took the picture. the picture appeared in life at the time and one widely acclaimed awards for having been able to capture the moment as the person died, the moment with the person was about to die. and this is really the start of a whole tradition, a whole legacy of those of people facing death that have cluttered our news faces ever since. >> now, you use the word cluttered. what is the value of seeing that picture of the woman jumping? >> the value of a picture like that as it pulls us in subjectively. it is a very emotional picture. very dramatic, very memorable. poles and all kinds of motions for which we are able to engage the event. the a news event it is actually depicting, and this is important because not only do we want to understand why we're seeing, what we want to feel important things about what we're seeing like to fear feel -- feel fear, anguish,
it in new york and san francisco and seattle and chicago, all of these places, in the london and paris. we see the try um of the developed world cities. but the success of the city in the developed world is nothing relative to what's happening in the developing world. we've recently reached that halfway point where more than half of humanity now lives in urbanized areas, and it's hard not to think on net that's a good thing because when you compare those countries that are more than 50% urbanized, the more urbanized countries have on average income levels that are five times higher and infant mortality levels that are less than a third. gandhi famously said the growth of a nation depends not on its cities, but on its villages. but with all due respect to the great man, on this one he was completely and utterly wrong. because, in fact, the future of india is not made in villages which is too often remaining mired in the unending rural poverty that has plagued most of humanity throughout almostal of its -- almost all of it existence. it is mumbai, it is delhi, that are the pathways out of po
might have a quarterback controversy brewing in new york and tim t-bill is still waiting for his chance to get on the field and i don't know if he ever will. >>host: 7 will join us who is calling us right now and she is a giants fan and welcome to the football fan shop here at hsn and you are a giants fan are you in new york or a displaced and. >>caller: i and in new york. >>host: you still come to hsn for the best cook but there are ground? >>caller: i have three of these instuff i also ordered another one for my brother. >>host: a year later, how was it will they not? >>caller: the watches good, it feels good. >>host: baby and for an exciting playoff season. >>guest: 11 in maine has been a little off but usually catches fire towards the end. >>caller: money is on the vine, a light comes through for us. and >>host: thank you so much for joining us. have a wonderful weekend think you for sharing your story. she got her through last season and she talks about how great the looks and how wonderful it washes and she is calling back to let you know that this is a speci
that is so dishonorable as to leave this great nation. i'm leaving immediately for new york. come with me or not. >> so loyalty -- did he say damn the torpedoes? >> did he say damn the -- well, i'm looking -- [laughter] my wife has heard me say this before. the words that i used in the book seem to to me to be the liy ones, that he was actually speaking to the captain of the ship right alongside four bells, captain -- [inaudible] full speed ahead and so on. so it wasn't quite what has come down in history, but the sense of it was pretty much that. and, of course, the question i always and -- ask my students is if he might have said, damn, the torpedoes! [laughter] we may never know. >> as i quote in the book, there was a marine standing near farragut on the hartford when the tecumseh went down and the brooklyn, which was just ahead of the hartford in the line of ships, stopped at the line of torpedoes, and the whole fleet came to a stop at fort morgan who were punishing them. and that's when farragut orderlied the hartford to go ahead of the brooklyn, and the rest of the ships followed, a
in places you'd expect; new york, london, frankfurt, tokyo, with a couple of really interesting outliers. and in the outliers was a lot of my story, places like ashford, virginia, where if you ask the network engineers that i spent a lot of time with, they would say, oh, new york, london, los angeles, ashburn, not as if it were this tiny suburb. so it's a surprisingly short list of places that are by far the hot spots, the kind of supernodes on the internet. >> host: what did these supernodes look like, mr. blum, when you visit them? >> guest: well, from the outside, they look a bit like you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall. they are quite generic from the outside, deliberately so. they try to hide in plain sight, at least when you're driving by them. inside some of them are in, um, are in old kind of art deco buildings that used to belong to western union or old telecom palaces. others are kind of, have what their operators like to call a cyberific look, kind of the aesthetic adjective of choice, meaning they kind of look like a science fiction movie, and that's deliberate.
used to sell patricia cornwell. each unto itself. it begs the question when we put an ad in "new york times" come it's not like putting an advertisement for a honda or a cadillac. it is one book. it is not random house advertising on its books. it's one book. it's a very different and very subjective business, which means that you can only fit so much when it comes to marrying books to readers, books for which publishers pay a deal for. when i was at schuster, they paid $8 million, which had been a record number for ronald reagan's memoir, called american life. you know, the math as well as i do. you need to sell 4 million books. not just write a million dollars, you need to sell 250,000. the book actually sold about 300,000 copies. so it was a spectacular failure. because of the comparison. it's a highly complex business with a very thin margin of process. when you add to that the dramatic changes in technology and the public demand, you have an industry that needs to redefine itself. nobody knows that more than the people sitting on the stage who are here to talk to you about it. yo
. i moved back to new york. i am from new york and started working at "forbes" of the pr department. >> elizabeth ames, or practical experience, how do that that? >> i've learned a lot since "forbes." when i sat "forbes" islandwide about markets. again, i began as a journalist and worked at "businessweek" many years ago as a journalist. but when i started to work as an entrepreneur, i learned about the fact that you really need to have economic freedom to create jobs. something i learned personally. if you're obviously just getting a paycheck, you really don't understand how government can affect that firsthand. that was one of the things that led me to think this is a useful idea for a book. >> overall, philosophically, how do you see the role of government, the role of congress, the role of the president in the economy? >> basically this book raises and answers the question. we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and create jobs. when government battles too much in the economy, its policies are driven by politics and markets are driven by indi
plummeted, but i had looks. i had the new york public library. thank god for the new york public library. and i had books. when i had the difficulties with my mom, i found my emotional voice and portrait of the artist as a young man. his mother asked him to pray with her and he refused. that tension, and when i had the idea of sometimes being fearful, i had that batch of courage. books gave me a voice that expressed my individual humanity. >> books helped used turn into a writer. do you want to talk for a moment about how you got into writing? >> i began writing, i had speech difficulties as well but my siblings all had speech difficulties. we came up in west virginia. i couldn't speak very well or read very well aloud, so eventually a teacher said, right something. i will throw my books that you or hate you. depending on how far she was. she said i could write something and i really enjoyed that. that was the only thing i was praised for at that age. i enjoyed writing. at 15 i was put back into school and at 16 i joined the army on my 17th birthday. >> you have before you one of the mos
of the popular interests was that a newspaper called the new york sun, a penny pressed paper, took a tremendous interest in this case. now the penny press you would need to know was a new kind of newspaper meant for a broader part of the population, the old commercial newspapers, they were commercial, and they were bought by merchants, middle class people, people involved in commerce, and the penny press was for working people, especially in new york so the editor of the new york sun sends not only correspondence to new lone done and new haven, but he also sent artists, and i want to show you what one of them produced. now, this is an amazing image. here's the pose of a heroic cop qerer, with his machette in his hand. he's like an avenger of justice, is he not? put this in the context of most of the graphic representations of people of african dissent in this period were racist in the extreme. this is a very different image. first time i saw it, i thought, my goodness, must be a abolitionist group. nope, it's the new york sun. why did they do it? because they thought they would make money selli
card and also authorized by reviewing correspondence held in the federal reserve bank of new york. the fed did not like that one bit. and finally over $100 of interviews i assure you can guess. let me turn to some substance. a story of the mansard under five presidents serving under the five greatest crisis in history i will tell you about the crisis first broke crisis number one is cold. some of you may remember nixon suspended foreign central banks to exchange dollars for gold. he called this particular incident the single most significant event. crisis number two is inflation. the annual rate is double-digit in 1979 jimmy carter appointed him chairman of the federal reserve board over the strenuous objection of his advisers who say it is too independent and outspoken. two months later paul volcker raised interest-rate to higher levels than the chairman himself sought 15% of long-term treasury securities and bond commercial banks and loans as a record that still stands. crisis number three is the world financial crisis that is still with us. the volcker rule label was announced
reprint extracts from that addition in their home, often under dateline. see here is new york six are also a boston gazette issue from 1766. so here the deadline tells me this news came from new york and quit akeley new york newspaper. after action reports are also at primary source of news funds the work begins. so after action reports or when the commanding a third right a summary of the events of the military engagement and send them up the chain. often in america the president of congress. he would share that report with the local newspaper printer. then dad newspaper the sun that and you receive the report appeared in newspapers up and down the colonies. so we are we have 1777 issue of the continental journal. this includes george washington's own account of the battle of trenton and crossing of the delaware. you can see at the top the dateline baltimore. as for congress is meeting at the time. i said earlier that she really don't see a lot of headlines in the 18th century newspapers. mostly defines an excerpt of a letter from. here is the april 21st 1775 issue of the new hampshire ga
a life in new york i liked and i kind of thought i would approach it as a regular reporting gig where i would report, work really hard for a week, get everything done that needs to be done and retreat back to new york. it didn't work out that way and i find myself spending more time here than in new york, making more friends and being inspired by kinsfolk like what you just mentioned, sort of -- there's an interesting energy that it is hard to put your finger on, cooper who live quote in the book is not native, she moved here in the 80s and longtime journalist and really smart thing for about detroit and she talks about how detroit is a place where people are doing things everyday that you are not expected to do and people coming home from work not patrolling their neighborhoods because there are not police, reclaiming vacant lots, turning into gardens or a bird concert tour boarding up vacant houses, there's a chapter in the book about detroit, that surprised me, the extent of that and how real and inspirational that can be. >> some of the characters you come across in your journey in
of covenant house, and tina kelley, former staff writer for "the new york times," talk about their book on teenage homelessness, "almost home." >> some of them making $7 and change an hour. and many of them working overtime to try to make more money but still qualify for programs like s.n.a.p., and so here we are allowing many of our employees -- especially as i was saying behind the curtain. i think the curtain's there to block the sex and love section. [laughter] do you notice that is the one that's curtained off here? it's like 7/eleven, so you guys should put your book on the sex aisle. [laughter] it would sell much better. >> we should have called the book "50 shades of homelessness." >> yeah. it would have sold a lot better. >> it would have. >> so the -- you guys have such dirty minds. get out of the gutter. [laughter] but these guys, the poignant testimonies you were telling us because we live in a society where here are front line first responders. these guys tell stories about intervening in petty crime. we had one of the buildings that was targeted by some people who had terr
how it would go. i had a life in new york, likedded my life there, and i thought i would approach it as sort of a regular reporting gig where i would come in, report work, really hard for, like, a week, you know, get everything done i needed done, and then retreat back to new york for four weeks. it didn't work out that way. i mean, i really found myself spending more time here than in new york and really making a lot of great friends, and, really, i don't know. being inspired by, you know, things, like, you know, things like what you just mentioned, you know, the pete bara weekly thing, and just, you know, that -- there is a kind of interesting energy that -- it's hard to put your finger on, but it's, you know, des cooper, you probably know her, i quote here in the book. >> sure. >> she's not innative to detroit, moved here in the 1980s, a long time journalist, a smart thinker about detroit, and she talked about how detroit is the sort of place where, you know, people are doing things every day that you're not expecting to do anywhere else. i mean, people are coming home from wor
new york times." that happen on thursday and they really wanted me to focus on the elite colleges. so a whole chapter on yale and harvard in the book and i mentioned in one case since i'm so used to these cases at this point i'm kind of surprised at how powerful their response was. this was a case where harvard and yale have the game and that's why they play than in football. this is funny thing it is such a big deal but they like to make fun of each other and they have pretty crude slogans plastered on them on t-shirts to make fun of each other. one of them is you can't spell harvard without vd. [laughter] and in 2009 they decided to go highbrow. the ticket quote from the 1920 book by f. scott fitzgerald and it is i believe all harvard men are sissies like i used to be giving it a very pretentious, like a lot of us and extending about why i'm going to princeton. and there are -- and scott fitzgerald, we agree. so they finally got highbrow in this fight and they were banned from having this t-shirt because someone claimed this was meant to be an anti-gang slurs. this isn't the delegat
in california and that was brodrick one. back in new york more tom was a runner, a porch boy coming it in the competition among brodrick came us to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. that's what his plan was. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw, the worlds ugliest man, have you a chance, murderous, gunslingers, conmen, just absolutely amazing people. i thought it got to write this. as i work in a release we are very close to it the tom sawyer met mark twain in may of 1863 about three blocks from here. the old thing in the same room. twain liked to talk to tom because tom movies free stories and they played cards and drink here matching campaign. so that was the genesis. i thought this has got to be written. so while the series of tiny bits and pieces, diaries and stuff; it's a. but this is a result. i took out as they do, 40,000 words. can you imagine? spicer have over shop may mark, but i do love it. it's the most fun. i guess they could read you some know if you'd like. this may take a second. i've never read in public record. so
gather to watch and other places as well. in times square in the new york city and classrooms around the country in paris and iraq and afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there and there is a big crowd on the mall. i'm going to speak to you today about this great historic subject come of this institution and i am not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which organized the book. rather the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams to going to the president. instead it is divided by the various parts of the day and then i sprinkle vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them of course very traditional, and a lot of them i'm always looking for those, too. i also going to cover some things we are not going to see it coming inauguration in january because this time we do not have a change of power. as we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes. but nevertheless in the morning at inauguration when a president does the office come here is a 1961 dwight e
there is the tiramisu and you can get the cheesecake from new york. you can combination or option. you can get the chocolate trouble or tiramisu cake,ruffle art tiramisu cake, tea's or tiramisu cake for cake for the chocolate truffle and cheesecake and tiramisu >>guest: we do not overcook the cake it stays nice and moist once we take them out of the% oven we3 cheesecake stay in refrigerator and we molded it takes 24 hours to make agreed tuesday. this is unbelievable. >>host: yours is so good it has such great flavor. what i love about your cakes and they're not sharing their subtle and delicious. when you put them in your mouth they x load with flavor. these a customer picks and order start over here we are gonna start with the tiramisu and cheesecake that is your first choice. you get the chocolate truffle cake and tiramisu bat is your second choicechoice and finally you can choose a the chocolate trouble and the cheesecake.escher willingham 360 leftreally have 360 lots. >>guest: is the dust by chocolate and 7 layer cake that the chocolate trouble at ise real trick deal. deal. >>guest:
because i will be in new york for that. hello. i will see you later. that was good. do you know who it is dedicated to? >> no. >> it's a crackerjack surprise inside. has your husband read it yet? spent he's busy. leave him alone. >> he changed his e-mail address on the, by the way. spent i don't know what your e-mail is. >> both of you change your e-mail address on it. i hadn't planned to say anything but since i'm late, my publisher, editor at eagle told me it would be polite for me to say something. so i just want to for startup i think it's all human events fault that i was late. that's the most important thing. it's not my fault. and thank you so much for all come tonight. sensuality anything about this in any of the mainstream media, except the view, love those gals. i really, really do love them because everything they were saying is everything released by the near times. but "the new york times" is too chicken to argue with me about it. and without sounding like this paranoid, i've never had a book as ignored by the mainstream media as this book. my first book i did a series
are the national press club for the annual authors night and we are joined now by michael ward and of the new york times. in the game is his most recent book. if you could summarize this for us. >> this took me three years and it's the first comprehensive history of the war and iraq and i think what makes it unique is i incorporate not only the views of the american policymakers but all of the iraqi leadership from maliki, their rivals, their adversaries, the former insurgents, and so i incorporated the iraqi account of what was going on as well as the american account and what is happening on the battlefield and the war in iraq. i try to put all together in one book. >> why you call it to the endgame? >> because i covered the surge and its the endgame of american military involvement and i spent the last third of the book covers the obama administration that hasn't been well covered by the media and i learned a lot from doing this and during the campaign president obama talked about the gold at the end of the war in iraq and we certainly took down the troops but what i discovered in doing the boo
, for the inauguration. people gathered to watch in other places as well. in times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugur
university in new york and now mercy college. i should also mention my wife does the income from festival, so we have a film festival as well. a lot of things that we do and really enjoy it. >> what did you do for the cia? >> question. i was an economist on the brazil desk very much involved with commodities in the energy crisis in the 70's. the cia was just too bureaucratic for me. so i wanted to break out and do something more on gennaro. i get involved in the financial revolution, started being a managing editor of a news article, the inflation survival letters in the 1970's which is now called personal finance, a much more establishment name. my own newsletters forecast and strategies. seven robbery and was elected and it has been a great ride. i consider myself a survivor in many ways. i maintained my contacts and the cia because i think there are a good source for information. we're a global economy, and the cia does everything. they've done research on virtually everything. >> we invited you want book tv to talk about the making of modern economics, the lives and ideas of right thinker
justice and for what at what cost. i participated to the united nation to new york come to one of these peace conferences, dialogue of cultures, dialogue religions come the salon and so forth, shortly after he felt was made in the united states. and this of course it again led to killings all over the world. everybody backing down their hatches. the question i asked myself, what contributed to this looks? why is it that anyone religion considers that it is so sacrosanct it cannot be common to john either through film or theater in the public domain is subject to public comment tree. for any religion to claim the sacrosanct duty is the same mentality that denigrated other religions in their time, but now has assumed universal and political proportions. some bullish register in far-off denmark splashes the image is of profit a hundred in the cartoon to send in nigeria is flattered. this level of empowerment has become -- seems to have become except the boat, so one needs at this time to start propagating as much existence of other religions to have this kind of conduct is an abom
. the vulnerability, the fragility of life, in cities like ours in new york and new jersey and how it doesn't take that much effort to be there for our kids. i was very happy during sandy we did some things to raise through covenant house and the cooperation of extraordinary people to raise a lot of money because it doesn't take that much money to give a person the doorway of hope. the last thing i will say is for me i get very upset because when i first became mayor i have a metaphor that i clung to, i would tell people i was such an optimistic and hopeful person, i am a prisoner of hole. we walked through city hall seven years ago there were so many challengess, we are prisoners of hope. we do nothing but hope. seven years later my metaphor has changed because i see powerful the trans formative things happen in every sector of the city from a down housing market to creativity, to double the production of affordable housing. first time in sixty years the population is going up. downtown in 40 years, built by new yorkers, so my metaphor has changed. i am no longer a prisoner of hope, i am hope unh
to be here. as i tell my history students at the city university of new york in the ph.d. program -- thank you. [laughter] as i tell my history students until they want to choke me the past is a foreign country. we can visit, try to learn the customs and the white smith the fragrances, recoil at the foul odors but we are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much in the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy as it is this time around. first there are people you have to talk to. and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of committees, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know they don't know at all. the difficulty is that it is not always easy to establish to construct the path that is so close to us and yet this is what historians have to do. our job i
money. bill littlefield sisters from upstate new york. the first sister was 20 years old who came in 1866 and was visiting cousins who lived in chesterfield and they told her skinner was looking for new workers. she applied, got the job and was an expert schooler says she worked in the finishing department. she would take the silk thread from the dye house and wind it on the school to go to market. it required tremendous skill because you could not damage the silk whatsoever. it would be sold. she was fantastic. another sister followed named francis. one sister would work in the milken if she had a good experience then she would send word. , join me. said you had a number of siblings working together. a family environment. the third sister was alan. she lasted both of resistors and is working for skinner at the time of the flood and is a stronger character of the book and after words help to salvage his silk and she moved to holyoke and ultimately married his bookkeeper. after the flood the valley could potentially be somebody else's gain. after the disaster the valley was a popul
in california. back in new york where tom was a torch boy, he had been in competition with broderick. when he came west to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw -- heavyweight champs, gunslingers, con men, absolutely amazing people. and we are very close to it. that tom sawyer actually met him in may of 19 -- 1863. mark twain like to talk to tom because tom knew great stories. all these little little bits and pieces and stories, that is how long it took, 15 years. can you imagine? i do love it. it is so fun. i guess i could read you some now if you would like. this may take a second. i have never read in public before. so i will start with a quote from tom sawyer. here it is. if you want to know how to i come to figure in his book, eat knowledge of the reporter and raise his brandy. they were speaking of mark twain, of course. as i said, we moved on to telling stories. sam was mighty fond of children and whenever he saw little fellows fighting on the street, they would go to the saloon at night and described t
to see woman is here with us today. she's the best selling "new york times" best-selling author. it is a gentleman, please join me in welcoming calista gingrich. [applause] we have with us tonight a very special guest. i know that if i were simply to get the typical dinner circuit introduction speaker did newt gingrich, the one where you list every accomplishment. i promise you it he here all night and even newt would get bored. his list of achievements and politics is involvement of lifelong learning. his expertise in national security matters, business ventures, philanthropic endeavors, dozens of books he's written just the list goes on and on. allow me for the moment to present that all of us here are well acquainted with the important milestones in the life of one newt gingrich. i want to focus in some part on the future. but i sincerely hope is misplaced and it as it relates to ideas. so let me explain. it is no secret to anyone here that the party of abraham lincoln and ronald reagan took a beating three weeks ago. republicans plus the bottle as well as seats in both the h
-examination, and these things, they live in a mythological memory. it was in the "new york times" three weeks ago or so in a box, you know, a-11, a war blur appeared in new york city in manhattan, and times photographed it, making the reference to this work we're going to talk about today, and then, i think, a classic status was enhanced by the seemingly never ending decades of controversy in which the defenders tried to make slanders of the authors of witness stick. today, i want to introduce the three panelists. this is an amazingly powerful group we have here. all at once. leave it to them. they will take it over. each, i hope, making remarks ten minute, and we'll open it up for further discussion. elliot a -- abrams had a remarkable strings of enormous importance. i remember him going back to the early reagan years. he began my knowledge with human rights, and that was really something, the jimmy carter invention of human rights, and in charge of latin american affairs, positions in the white house, and in every case, he really always brought deeply moral and intellectual realm into the work he was doing in
and so it took a while. my brother is a writer in new york and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife, back into my first year of legal research because i had to certify, authorize this piece of nonfiction. i felt with a memoir you could just wing it you can't because once you start highlighting things you've got to get authority for it. you even have to get consent from the people that you put photographs and. i had a letter from james meredith right after i left, which is in the book itself and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, we need his permission. i don't need his permission. he sent it to me that he didn't send us the world. i send a form letter to jackson mississippi and he signed it on the backside of the envelope, it's about time you got your book out 50 years later. so it took a long time. yeah, it did take longer than i thought it would but again piecing things together, "u.s. news and world report"'s, "life" magazine, look magazine, all those helped me support my story and the story again again of a protago
said, you know, my husband, they live in new york, he is a big money manager, and they were talking about some sort of new york cultural thing. and i was talking to both of them, and she was talking about it with great sort of enthusiasm, and i said does your husband know about this? she said, my husband? his feet do not touch the sidewalk in new york. a car pulls up in the morning, takes him to his office, the car pulls up, takes him to his lunch, takes him back to the office, takes him home. she said the only place that he walks in the world -- he work withs out in the gym, of course, but the only place he actually walks is davos because the streets are so crowded. thest one -- it's one of the things that adds to the ambience. it's true, they can't use their cars because the streets are so crowded, it's faster to walk. so they are really, really global. what is there relationship to the rest of us? and i think this is really a key, the key issue. and it's complicated. so i think we're living, even as we're living in this period of bigger divide between the very, very top and every
to help us are two guests in the new york studio, sarah weinman is news director for publishers marketplace, bob minzesheimer is the book reviewer and reporter for "usa today". sarah weinman, let's start with you. give us your general assessment of 2012 for the book industry especially when a comes to nonfiction books and what are one or two nonfiction books you want to talk about? >> let me start by saying 2012 was a very eventful year in the book publishing world between publishers consolidating the department of justice, doing five publishers and apple on e-book pricing and later into the program, amazon expanding its publishing operations, the google settlement moving forward in different directions. those alone account for a substantial portion of publishing news. on the non-fiction side it was a very strong year. in particular we are seeing a lot of best of 2012 lists dominated by behind the beautiful forevers which was winner of the national book awards. we had robert caro's latest volume in his ongoing biography of lyndon johnson and andrew sullivan's are from the free w
.com/booktv. here's a look at books being published this week. >>> now from albany, new york we hear about the state-mandated. it promotes cultural initiative through author presentations, film screenings, workshops and more. >> see each of them just vividly as i could see the posters. i'm donald faulkner. i'm director of the new york state writers institute. what we do, what i do is kind of intellectual. we bring a lot of writers through to albany to do readings. we do a number of other types of programs. events writing workshops and film series and programs with young writers and summer institute we run in czar tow saratoga. adventure but this thing ruined everything. >> go far and wide. find the west writers we can. it's like bringing the world to the particular place, and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organizations even some of the better known ones in major cities that have such a regular flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public with our open-door policy. so we bring the little rare -- literary world to albany. all these people's names and places and dat
with president obama and mrs. obama, and ca, this tor wrote "the obamas," a reporter with the "new york times," and david marines's first half on president obama, barack obama: the story" came out as well. >> guest: yes, whenever there's a sitting president, it's a boom for publishers who jump on the wagon and publish as much books as possible. it's interesting to me in particular because it delves into the early life of barack obama from his childhood to a student in new york to early organizing days and he did a thorough job in terms of talking with a whole lot of different people who knew the president in his early life. cantor also clearly did quite a bit of reporting and investigation with her book about the marriage between barack obama and michelle obama, and rachel, from what i understand, took a larger view looking at the first lady and her larger ancestry and putting together a larger story as a result. >> host: now, bob -- >> guest: now, those -- >> host: go ahead, please. >> guest: no, i was just going to say of the three, my favorite was the marines. it was exhaustive and exhaust
in california. and that was broderick i. back in new york where tom was a runner, torch boy, he had been in competition with broderick, and when broderick came west to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator, that's what his plan was, and he did become a senator. tom came along, and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw, the world's ugliest man, heavyweight champs, murderers, con men, i mean, just absolutely amazing people, i thought, well, i've got to write this. and as i'm working i realize -- and we are very close to it -- tom sawyer actually met mark twain in may of 1863 a about three blocks from here. in a steam room. and twain liked to talk to tom because tom knew these great stories. and they played cards and drank beer and went out drinking at night. so that was the genesis of it. i thought this has got to be written. so all these years of finding little bits and pieces of diaries, and that's how long it took. so this is the result. and i took out, as i do overdo stuff, 14,000 words. can you imagine? but i do love it, it's just the most fun. and i guess i
expect, new york, london and frankfurt and tokyo within interesting outlier and the outliers were a lot of my story places like ashburn virginia in unincorporated suburb where if you ask internet people in the network engineers that i spent a lot of time with what are the capitals of the internet they would say new york london los angeles and ashford. those are the places, the short list of places that are by far the hotspots, super nose on the global internet. >> host: would have the super nose look like mr. blum when you look at them? >> guest: from the outside they look a bit like you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall. there are quite generic from the outside. they try to hide in plain sight as you are driving by them. some of them are art deco buildings that used to belong to western western union or telecom palaces. others are kind of from operators like to call it cyber stickler, cyber stick an adjective of choice meaning they kind of look like they are science science-fiction and that is deliberate. they are sort of modeled after science-fiction in order to appeal to
tv.org. >> now, from albany, new york, we hear about the state-mandated new york state writer's institute. the program promotes cultural initiatives through author presentations, workshops, film screen things and more -- screenings and more. >> i can see each event just as vividly as i can see the posters before me. i'm donald faulkner, i'm director of the new york state writer's institute, and what we do, what i do is kind of herd intellectual cats. we bring a lot of writers through to albany to do readings, we also do a number of other types of programs, events, writing workshops and film series and programs with young writers and a summer institute that we run in saratoga. >> the life of the -- my life in the last few years was, i suppose you'd call it adventurous. but this thing ruined everything. [laughter] >> we go far and wide, find the best writers that we can and bring them to albany. it's like bringing the world to a particular place. and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organization, even some of the better known ones in major cities that have such a regular flow of
in nonfiction books and look ahead to 2013. joining us to help us are two guests in our new york studio, sarah weinman is the news director for "publishers marketplace" and bob minitz heymer is the book reviewer and reporter for "usa today." .. publishing operations, the google settlement moving forward in different directions. those olympic first stage apportion of bush publishing news. on the nonfiction front is a very strong year. in particular receipt of the best of 2012 list dominated by the likes of catherine coos behind beautiful forever is the witch was the winner of the national book award. the ongoing biography of lyndon johnson and andrew solomon's fire from the tree, only recently published over 900 each companion he had the king of different child-rearing examples of special needs children. so these two books on a very substantial books, but they're the tip the iceberg of nonfiction. >> host: minzesheimer, same question. >> guest: it was a big year for dead presidents. she remember robert harris is the fourth of five on monday june 10, which was just an incredible act of both repo
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